Zynq-Based, System-Level Debugging with Micrium’s μC/Probe

Adam Taylor, author of the "MicroZed Chronicles" on how to use the Xilinx Zynq and Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC, discusses using µC/Probe with Zync-based systems.

Being able to see internal software variables in our Zynq-based embedded systems in real time is extremely useful during system bring-up and for debugging. I often use an RS-232 terminal during commissioning to report important information like register values from my designs and have often demonstrated that technique in previous blog posts. Information about variable values in a running system provides a measure of reassurance that the design is functioning as intended and, as we progress through the engineering lifecycle, provides verification that the system is continuing to work properly. In many cases, we will develop custom test software that reports the status of key variables and processes to help prove that the design functions as intended.

This approach works well and has for decades—since the earliest days of embedded design. However, a better solution for Zynq-based systems that allows us to read the contents of the processor memory and extract the information we need without impacting the target’s operation and without the need to add a single line of code to the running target now presents itself. It’s called μC/Probe and it’s from Micrium, the same company that has long offered the µC/OS RTOS for a wide variety of processors including the Xilinx Zynq SoC and Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC.

Micrium’s μC/Probe tool allows us to create custom graphical user interfaces that display the memory contents of interest in our systems designs. With this capability, we can create a virtual dashboard that provides control and monitoring of key system parameters and we can do this very simply by dragging and dropping indicator, display, and control components onto the dashboard and associating them with variables in the target memory. In this manner, it is possible to both read and write memory locations using the dashboard.

Read the full article at Xilinx.com.

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